6361-6365 Sunset: Hofbrau Gardens / RCA Building

This block, on the north side of Sunset between Cahuenga and Morningside Court was owned by Jacob Muller and later his sons Frank and Walter.

On December 28. 1902, the LA Times reported that “J. Muller has a commodious frame building nearly completed on Sunset Boulevard to be used as a butcher shop.”

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6301 Sunset: Western Auto Supply / Wallichs Music City

Located on the northwest corner of Sunset and Vine and alternately addressed as 1501 Vine Street, this property belonged to retired toy air rifle manufacturer William F. Markham and his second wife Carrie. The Markham home was located near the southwest corner of the same intersection; Marham had built the Markham Building at 6372 Hollywood Boulevard at Cosmo Street in 1918 and also had numerous rental properties.

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6290 Sunset: Pig Stand / Carpenter’s Drive-In

The Pig Stand drive-in was built on the southeast corner of Sunset and Vine in 1931 opposite the already-established Carpenter’s drive-in at 6285 on the northeast corner. Owners “California Pig Stands Inc. Ltd.” applied for a permit in August 1931. J.W. Stromberg was the architect. The permit for a roof sign was issued in September 1931.

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5539 Sunset: Sunset House Restaurant

5539 Sunset Boulevard, between Western Avenue and St. Andrews Place, was designed by Shelby R. Coon in 1925 as an auto showroom, part of a cluster of automotive-related businesses built from 5533 to 5565 Sunset for E.F. Bogardus. Auburn dealer Wilshire Motors opened here in May 1926 amid a cluster of other auto-related businesses.

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5600 Sunset: Fanchon & Marco Studios / 2nd Hollywood Rollerbowl / Stardust Ballroom

The parcel that includes 5600 Sunset Boulevard is located between Wilton Place and St. Andrews Place.

In 1925, a 1-story brick automobile showroom and garage was built at the southwest corner of St. Andrews Place (addressed vatiously as 5600-5606 and 5600-5620 depending on the number of interior partitions). It’s function remained automobile-related through early 1931.

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